Thursday, September 30, 2010

Gambling YES/NO


Gambling is omnipresent it’s just a matter of finding it. To give an example, children challenge each other in terms of knowledge and information, like “which is the tallest building”, first kid says “PETRONAS TOWER” other says it is the “Burj TOWER” and they challenge each other out of excitement. It is therefore an intrinsic nature of humans to bet and play. In 2009, the world legal gambling market was worth $335 billion. This is slightly less than the turnover of the largest company in the world. Interestingly, the illegal gambling market could well have been worth much more.
What does such a ban serve? Is it simply to make citizens, who are engaged in a harmless consensual pastime, criminals? Or making gambling illegal, tells people that they live in a society that values honest work, rather than games of chance? It sounds kiddish isn’t it?
Gambling is no different than any other consensual crime. Prohibition doesn’t stops it. It only pushes it underground, where it is impossible to monitor fraud and scams. When you make a popular activity illegal, you also create new sources of funding for criminals. It is well known that the American experiment with alcohol prohibition resulted in chaos.
Consensual crimes such as gambling don’t result in casualties, or provide evidence of the crime. All parties to an illegal card game voluntarily participate. Thus, in order to enforce these laws, the police must go out and search for criminal activities. This creates number of problems.
First, it distorts the priorities of police. If there are no victims, murder crimes, car thefts, homicides and property issues cops should not go out and arrest people anyway.
Second, the government can’t impose a ban on gambling, without encroaching on privacy and civil liberties of its citizens.
Faced with this reality, and with the fact that their citizens are betting and gambling, an increasing number of countries are liberalizing their gambling laws. Is this a step in the right direction- Yes it is,
first ,anyways people are going to bet, and it is better to adequately regulate the gambling industry than it is to make them criminals,
second, that for most people betting is a harmless pastime?
Finally, the strongest argument for the legalization of gambling is also the simplest: individual freedom. A free society where the government prohibits activities that are immoral or indecent is not really a free society. Supporters of the ban say the game play is addictive, and often point to stories of addicts who backed away college funds, have lost their homes or turned to crime to repay their debts. But the madness with our own money should not be illegal. We did not stop people from blowing their savings in the stock market or in commercial markets or in the purchase of luxury, taking out mortgages or loans they can not afford. Its not government business to pollicise citizens' personal lives for bad habits in fact legalizing this will translate into huge amounts of tax collection for governments. If freedom means anything, it means the freedom to make our own choices about our own lives, our money, our habits and how we spend our leisure time.

1 comments:

vinod said...

it is a right step to legalize gambling for the sole motive of getting huge money in terms of taxes.but legalizing this thing means that government is openly encouraging bad things to do.country like india where people segregate good and bad things blindly which are coming generation by generation and the politics of india has one single motive that is increasing its vote bank, i dont think that any party afford to take such decision.

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